Eastern Cascades


At the beginning of his lecture tour, in early May, Chris, accompanied by James Earl, was escorted around the Eastern Cascades by Ron Ratko, former Proprietor of Northwest Native Seeds - the most knowledgeable plantsman and expert field botanist there is for Washington State, Oregon and California.  It was a privilege and honour.  Unfortunately, the warm and sunny weather was far from ideal for prolonged days in the field or plant photography but some pleasing images were taken

 'Sand  Penstemon'  (PENSTEMON ACUMINATUS)

       'Spreading Phlox'  (PHLOX  DIFFUSA) - forms spiny-leaved mats covered in flowers;
                 colour variations of pink and lavender are common, white occasional;  
           widespread in dry open areas to alpine terrain


 'Elegant Lupine'  LUPINUS  LEPIDUS 

 
 'Hedgehog  Cactus'  (PEDIOCACTUS  SIMPSONIINIGRISPINUS)

 Fluorescent pink flowers

'Bitteroot' (LEWISIA  REDIVIVA) - consumed by some tribes as an infrequent delicacy 

 'Upland  Larkspur' (DELPHINIUM NUTTALIANUM) - scattered and locally common in dry grassland, open ponderosa pine forests and on sagebrush slopes 

James Earl beside the curiously impressive fruiting stalks of 'Pine Drops' (PTEROSPORA  ANDROMEDA);  this saprophyte is found in deep humus soil of coniferous forest; the genus is named from the Greek petron - a wing  and sporos - seed, describing the unusual seed with its very large, net-like wing, which must be viewed under a microscope to appreciate its beauty

 

James Earl in front of a modest specimen of 'Ponderosa  Pine' 

Lichen-covered branches

  

 Trunk of PINUS PONDEROSA

Resin exuding from bark

Curious flowers of  'Brown's  Peony'  (PAEONIA  BROWNII)  -  only peony native to N.America

BASALT  GARDENS  - Sagebrush country


BALSAMORHIZA HOOKERI - which was kindly named by Vicki Demetre (anyone viewing plant images on this site which are not fully
identified or whose naming is in doubt, do get in touch)

Image of above species showing foliage - not as hairy as BALSAMORHIZA INCANA


 'Yellow Glacier Lily'  (ERYTHRONIUM  GRANDIFLORUM) - blooms soon after snowmelt, often at the edges of retreating snowbanks;
a very important root vegetable for local tribes in the past

'Sagebrush  Violet' (VIOLA TRINERVATA) 

 'Yellow Bells' (FRITILLARIA  PUDICA) - amongst the first to flowers as snow melts; found in dryish loose soil; as they age,
flowers turn orange then brick-red

Those wishing to learn more about the flora of the Eastern Cascades should purchase a copy WILD FLOWERS OF THE PACIFIC NORTH-WEST (Timber Press Field Guide) See: http://www.amazon.com/Wildflowers-Pacific-Northwest-Timber-Guides/dp/0881927457 

Images of individual species from the above book are available on-line, through Turner Photographics; typing in LUPINUS LEPIDUS e.g. : http://www.pnwflowers.com/flower/lupinus-lepidus-var-Lepidus

From these images one can access the outstanding University of Washington Herbarium site of the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture with more information and more images for each species:

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NORTH-AMERICAN PLANT ASSOCIATION

Why not join and learn more about the cultivation, study and conservation of North American flora?  See:

https://sites.google.com/a/shpa.org.uk/main/latest-situation


 

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